Kiểm tra và đánh giá theo chương trình


Source: http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/foundation10/viccurriculum/vietnamese/vietnamesecmt.aspx

By the end of Level 2

  • Students interact with the teacher and peers through action-related talk and play. (1)
  • They introduce themselves and others, and express thanks, likes and dislikes, needs and wishes, for example, Tôi tên là LanCm ơn bnTôi thích/ không thích Tôi mun ăn cơmChúc bn sinh nht vui v.  (2)
  • They use modelled repetitive language when participating in games and shared activities, and interact in classroom routines by responding to questions, following instructions and asking for permission, for example, D, em xong r Các em hãy đc theo cô. Thưa cô cho em đi ung nước. (3)
  • When interacting, they use the sounds and tones of Vietnamese and distinguish between questions, such as Ai? đâu? Khi nào?  không?, and commands, for example, Đng lên. (4)
  • They identify information and key words, such as names of people, for example, cô An, bn Hi; places, for example,trường, lp; or objects, for example, cái bàn; and convey information about themselves and their family, friends and school using modelled sentences and illustrations. (5)
  • They respond to imaginative experiences through miming, acting, and answering questions, and create and perform simple imaginative texts using familiar language and non-verbal forms of expression. (6)
  • Students use familiar vocabulary related to the classroom and home environment. (7)
  • They use simple sentences with appropriate word order to communicate information about themselves, for example, Tôi by tui, their family and the classroom, for example, Đây là gia đình tôi/ lp tôi. (8)
  • Students translate frequently used words and simple phrases and create simple bilingual texts for the immediate learning environment. (9)
  • They describe the experience of using Vietnamese and identify their roles as members of different groups, including the Vietnamese class and their family and community. (10)
  • Students identify the sounds and tones of the Vietnamese language in words and symbols. (11)
  • They identify similarities and differences between different types of familiar texts. (12)
  • They provide examples of the different titles and greetings that are used to address people in different situations. (13)
  • Students name some of the many languages used in Australia, identifying Vietnamese as one of the major community languages. (14)
  • They identify how the ways in which people use language reflect where and how they live and what is important to them. (15)

By the end of Level 4

  • Students use Vietnamese to interact with the teacher and peers to exchange information and experiences relating to themselves, their family and friends.
  • They use formulaic expressions to participate in simple transactional exchanges and collaborative activities, and to seek clarification, assistance or advice in everyday classroom routines, for example, Làm ơn cho biết.
  • When interacting, they use features of Vietnamese pronunciation, including tones, vowels and consonants.
  • Students locate information relating to familiar contexts and present it in modelled spoken, written and visual texts.
  • They respond to imaginative texts by identifying favourite elements and making simple statements about settings, characters or events, and create simple imaginative texts using formulaic expressions and modelled language.
  • Students use common action verbs (for example, đi, ăn, ng, chơi, chy, nói, cười, làm, hc), adjectives (for example, đp, xu, tt, đen, đ) and adverbs (for example, nhanh, chm, hay, gii), to create short, simple sentences about their routines and interests.
  • They use vocabulary related to school, home and everyday routines.
  • They use appropriate word order and personal pronouns in simple spοken and written texts, for example, Đây là con mèo con ca tôi/anh/em/cháu. 
  • They translate and compare common Vietnamese and English expressions and create simple bilingual texts for classroom use.
  • Students describe how language involves behaviours as well as words and share their experiences of communicating in Vietnamese- and English-speaking contexts.
  • Students identify the tones of the Vietnamese language and use tone markers when writing.
  • They identify the features and purpose of a range of familiar texts.
  • They provide examples of how language use varies according to the participants, social context and situation (for example, cho em/tng bn/biếu bà mt món quà), and identify differences between ways of showing politeness in Vietnamese- and English-speaking contexts.
  • They identify how languages change over time, providing examples of Vietnamese words borrowed from other languages such as English and French.
  • They compare Vietnamese and English language use and cultural practices, identifying culture-specific terms and expressions.

By the end of Level 6

  • Students use spoken and written Vietnamese for classroom interactions and to share ideas and opinions and express feelings. (1)
  • They exchange information about aspects of their daily life, school, friends and leisure activities. (2)
  • They make shared decisions and arrangements, organise events and complete transactions. (3)
  • When participating in classroom and collaborative activities, they ask and respond to questions, and express opinions, for example, Bạn thích ăn cơm hay phở? Tôi thích ăn phở vì nó thơm ngon và bổ. (4)
  • Students use specific features of pronunciation and intonation, including tones, when interacting. (5)
  • They locate, classify and compare information from a range of familiar texts, and share information and ideas on topics of interest in paragraphs or short texts selected to suit different audiences. (6)
  • They respond to imaginative texts by describing key elements, and create short imaginative texts or alternative versions of texts they have heard, read or viewed. (7)
  • Students use everyday language and topic-specific vocabulary to express ideas and opinions and discuss events in time and place. (8)
  • They construct sentences using nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs and familiar expressions and idioms (for example, đen như mực, hiền như Bụt, có công mài sắt có ngày nên kim), to suit the context and purpose of communication. (9)
  • Students use simple sentences and form compound sentences using conjunctions such as và,hay/hoặc, vì, nhưng, nê (10)
  • When writing, they apply appropriate spelling and punctuation in a range of sentence types. (11)
  • Students translate simple texts from Vietnamese into English and vice versa, identifying words that are easy or difficult to translate, and create bilingual texts for their own language learning and for the school community. (12)
  • Students identify ways in which their family origins, traditions and beliefs impact on their identity and influence how they communicate in Vietnamese and English. (13)
  • Students form new words by adding or changing tone markers, initial consonants and vowels (for example, buổi, cuối, đuổi, tuổi, chuối), and identify how changes to pitch affect the meaning of words, for example, thương, thường, thưởng, thượ (14)
  • They compare the structure and language features of familiar texts and identify ways in which audience, context and purpose influence language choices. (15)
  • They identify ways in which language use varies according to context and situation, for example, Chào các bạ Kính thưa thầy/cô. (16)
  • Students provide examples of how the Vietnamese language has changed over time and identify ways in which regional dialects and accents have influenced the language, for example, dialectal variations such as bố/ba, mẹ/má, cái thìa/cái muỗng, Em tên gì?/Em tên chi? Đi đâu?/Đi mô? (17)
  • They identify language choices that reflect the influence of Vietnamese values and beliefs, and apply culturally appropriate behaviours and language when communicating in a range of familiar situations. (18)

By the end of Level 8

  • Students use spoken and written Vietnamese to initiate and sustain interactions with peers, teachers, family members and other known adults, and to engage in transactions and exchange ideas and experiences.
  • They ask and respond to open-ended questions such as Bạn nghĩ sao về vấn đề này? Tại sao bạn nghĩ như vậy?, and offer and justify their own opinions.
  • They make enquiries (for example, Mẹ định tổ chức sinh nhật con như thế nào?) and suggestions (for example, Chúng mình tham gia biểu diễn văn nghệ trong trường đi!), to solve problems, make decisions and organise events and services.
  • They use verbs such as nên, cần and phải to give advice or express their attitudes on topics of discussion.
  • They make comparisons and state preferences using bằng, hơn and nhất.
  • They rephrase statements or provide examples to clarify meaning, and elaborate on or justify ideas.
  • When interacting, they use appropriate Vietnamese pronunciation and intonation patterns in a range of sentence structures.
  • Students locate, analyse and compare information on topics of shared interest from a variety of texts, and convey information and ideas using modes of presentation selected to suit their audience and purpose.
  • They share their responses to different imaginative texts by expressing opinions about the ways characters and events are represented and by explaining themes, messages and the storyline.
  • They create texts with imaginary places, events, people and experiences in a range of forms, using direct speech (for example, Ba mẹ nói với tôi: ‘Con nên chăm học’), and indirect speech (for example, Ba mẹ bảo tôi nên chăm học).
  • They manipulate a range of structures to express their own perspectives on experiences, events and issues.
  • They use a variety of sentence types (affirmative, negative, interrogative, imperative and exclamatory) to express attitudes, opinions or emotions.
  • They translate texts from Vietnamese into English and vice versa, using simple strategies to overcome challenges, and compare their versions with others’.
  • They produce multimodal bilingual resources for the school and the wider community, providing annotations and commentaries to assist meaning.
  • They reflect on the importance of language and behaviour in intercultural communication and how being a learner of Vietnamese contributes to their own sense of identity.
  • Students analyse the use of punctuation and tone markers in different sentence types, including affirmative (for example, Em ăn cơm), negative (for example, Em không ăn cơm), interrogative (for example, Em ăn cơm không?), imperative (for example, Ăn cơm đi!) and exclamatory, for example, Em ăn nhiều cơm quá!
  • They identify the meaning of Vietnamese homonyms (for example, hay may mean ‘usually’ or ‘interesting’) depending on the context.
  • They analyse the structure and linguistic features of different types of texts and explain how these features are influenced by each text’s context, audience and purpose.
  • They identify variations in language use between written and spoken texts and explain how language choices depend on the participants, relationships and purpose of the exchange.
  • They identify the impact of social, cultural and intercultural influences on language, and use and explain Vietnamese words that have emerged through contact with other languages (for example, cà rốt, cà phê, căn-tin), and from globalisation and technological advances, such as toàn cầu hóa, công nghệ thông tin, nhật ký điện tử, nói chuyện qua mạng.
  • They explain how cultural ideas and perspectives are embedded in language use and communication styles, for example, the importance of politeness and respect in Vietnamese language and culture.

By the end of Level 8

  • Students use spoken and written Vietnamese to initiate and sustain interactions with peers, teachers, family members and other known adults, and to engage in transactions and exchange ideas and experiences.
  • They ask and respond to open-ended questions such as Bạn nghĩ sao về vấn đề này? Tại sao bạn nghĩ như vậy?, and offer and justify their own opinions.
  • They make enquiries (for example, Mẹ định tổ chức sinh nhật con như thế nào?) and suggestions (for example, Chúng mình tham gia biểu diễn văn nghệ trong trường đi!), to solve problems, make decisions and organise events and services.
  • They use verbs such as nên, cần and phải to give advice or express their attitudes on topics of discussion.
  • They make comparisons and state preferences using bằng, hơn and nhất.
  • They rephrase statements or provide examples to clarify meaning, and elaborate on or justify ideas.
  • When interacting, they use appropriate Vietnamese pronunciation and intonation patterns in a range of sentence structures.
  • Students locate, analyse and compare information on topics of shared interest from a variety of texts, and convey information and ideas using modes of presentation selected to suit their audience and purpose.
  • They share their responses to different imaginative texts by expressing opinions about the ways characters and events are represented and by explaining themes, messages and the storyline.
  • They create texts with imaginary places, events, people and experiences in a range of forms, using direct speech (for example, Ba mẹ nói với tôi: ‘Con nên chăm học’), and indirect speech (for example, Ba mẹ bảo tôi nên chăm học).
  • They manipulate a range of structures to express their own perspectives on experiences, events and issues.
  • They use a variety of sentence types (affirmative, negative, interrogative, imperative and exclamatory) to express attitudes, opinions or emotions.
  • They translate texts from Vietnamese into English and vice versa, using simple strategies to overcome challenges, and compare their versions with others’.
  • They produce multimodal bilingual resources for the school and the wider community, providing annotations and commentaries to assist meaning.
  • They reflect on the importance of language and behaviour in intercultural communication and how being a learner of Vietnamese contributes to their own sense of identity.
  • Students analyse the use of punctuation and tone markers in different sentence types, including affirmative (for example, Em ăn cơm), negative (for example, Em không ăn cơm), interrogative (for example, Em ăn cơm không?), imperative (for example, Ăn cơm đi!) and exclamatory, for example, Em ăn nhiều cơm quá!
  • They identify the meaning of Vietnamese homonyms (for example, hay may mean ‘usually’ or ‘interesting’) depending on the context.
  • They analyse the structure and linguistic features of different types of texts and explain how these features are influenced by each text’s context, audience and purpose.
  • They identify variations in language use between written and spoken texts and explain how language choices depend on the participants, relationships and purpose of the exchange.
  • They identify the impact of social, cultural and intercultural influences on language, and use and explain Vietnamese words that have emerged through contact with other languages (for example, cà rốt, cà phê, căn-tin), and from globalisation and technological advances, such as toàn cầu hóa, công nghệ thông tin, nhật ký điện tử, nói chuyện qua mạng.
  • They explain how cultural ideas and perspectives are embedded in language use and communication styles, for example, the importance of politeness and respect in Vietnamese language and culture.